Tag Archives: Troupville River Camp

Valdosta City Council votes to send letter supporting Troupville River Camp 2019-12-05

Last night on the Valdosta City Council agenda, as mentioned Monday on WCTV, they did vote for the Mayor to send a letter of support for the Troupville River Camp project.

[Voting]
Voting

This was the last scheduled act of outgoing Mayor John Gayle, for which we thank him and the Council.

WWALS Executive Director Gretchen Quarterman thanked them in Citizens to Be Heard.

Before the meeting, I handed in Continue reading

WCTV: Valdosta City Council to consider supporting Troupville River Camp 2019-12-02

She got a quote from the Mayor:

“We have the park out there where there’s a landing and parking areas and things like that, so it could be a tourist attraction, and people stopping in here to buy supplies and getting ready for their river trips,” said Valdosta Mayor John Gayle. “It could be a plus for us.”

He’s not in the WCTV video, but you may recognize the logo on this cap:

[at the confluence of the two rivers]
at the confluence of the two rivers

The Troupville River Camp project goes beyond what’s out there now; see this TV report: Continue reading

Solar farm by Spring Branch near Withlacoochee River and landfill 2019-12-03

Another in a line of solar projects near the Withlacoochee River is being heard right now by the Valdosta-Lowndes County Zoning Board of Appeals.

[Context]
Context Map
Source: WWALS Withlacoochee and Little River Water Trail Map.

You can see the Beltline Energy Solar Project towards the bottom of this map, north of US 84 (labeled US 221), and just east of Spring Branch, which runs northwards by the Kinderlou Subdivision to the Withlacoochee River.

North of this proposed solar project are solar panels Continue reading

Troupville River Camp on Valdosta City Council agenda 2019-12-05

On the Valdosta City Council agenda for 5:30 PM this Thursday is:

7.b. Consideration of a request from the WWALS Watershed Coalition for a Letter of Support for the Troupville River Camp.

[2019-10-31--center-of-wlrwt]
Troupville River Camp at the center of the Withlacoochee and Little River Water Trail (WLRWT), leading from the Little and Withlacoochee Rivers upstream in Georgia, down the Withlacoochee River to Florida and the Suwannee River, with its own River Camps.

If I understand correctly, the Mayor plans to discuss this item with Council, and then write and send a letter of support. Anyone who wants to attend to support this action by Valdosta, please come. I may stand up afterwards in Citizens to Be Heard to thank them.

At 5:30 PM, Tuesday, December 10, 2019, at the Lowndes County Commission Regular Session, I will Continue reading

Troupville River Camp, center of Little and Withlacoochee River Water Trail 2019-10-31

Here’s the narrative we sent Thursday in the WWALS pre-application to the Georgia Outdoor Stewardship Program (GOSP):


A Troupville River Camp will attract paddling and fishing enthusiasts of all ages. The property is located at the Confluence of the Little River with the Withlacoochee River, off of I-75 and GA 133 just west of Valdosta, the biggest city in the Suwannee River Basin. Proposed amenities include air-conditioned bathrooms, hot and cold running water, five screened sleeping platforms, picnic tables and benches, outdoor fire pits, and paddle boat racks for canoes, kayaks, and paddle boards, with river access near the Confluence.

[Paddlers departing in the Confluence Viewscape]
Paddlers departing in the Confluence Viewscape

The location is historic, where Troupville was the former Lowndes County seat before Valdosta, from 1833 to 1860. The property has been privately owned since then and is now available for purchase for this purpose.


Map of Troupville, GA adapted from C.S. Morgan, in Ray City History Blog, 9 February 2014, Map of Old Troupville, GA with Notes on the Residents.
jsq note: the scale of the streets on this map is too large; few of them extended onto the subject property;
thanks for clarification by Wiregrass Region Digital History Project (WRDHP).

The Land Between the Rivers has Continue reading