Map 2015-04-16

Update 2014-04-26: See newer map.

Draft map of 16 April 2015.

Changes in this map of the Alapaha River Water Trail, made from the Spreadsheet:

  • Adds Grand Bay boat ramps, hiking trail, boardwalk, and campsite.
  • Combines some layers to have fewer layers.
  • Moves all public lands to the Other layer.
  • Adds tracks for the Willacoochee River and the Little Alapaha River, thanks to Chris Graham.

Still to do in the next map: add Grand Bay WMA and Banks Lake NWR as Public Land and separate out Banks Lake and Grand Bay as features. Also make popups show what’s upstream and downstream from that point.

Interactive Map

Follow this link to the interactive map.

The interactive map is also embedded below:

Points on the Maps

Follow this link for a table of all access points on the Alapaha River that were used in the making of this map.

This second table is very large: all points used in the making of this map.

Static Maps

300x816 ARWT Narrow, in Alapaha River Water Trail, by John S. Quarterman, for WWALS.net, 16 April 2015 The static maps were made using google maps’ own print feature, which does interesting things like move text labels around to not overlap, and omit some of them if necessary.

The first static map is the entire Water Trail. Click on it for a bigger version.

See also the PDF version.

The map legend is below here:

ARWT Legend, in Alapaha River Water Trail, by John S. Quarterman, 16 April 2015

Here’s a wider version of the whole ARWT. Remember: click on the map to see a bigger map.

600x1209 ARWT Wide, in Alapaha River Water Trail, by John S. Quarterman, for WWALS.net, 16 April 2015

Upstream and Downstream

The next two static maps are for two pieces of the ARWT: Upstream and Downstream. Remember: click on the map to see a bigger map.

ARWT Upstream

300x367 ARWT Upstream, in Alapaha River Water Trail, by John S. Quarterman, for WWALS.net, 16 April 2015 ARWT Upstream PDF.

ARWT Downstream

300x393 ARWT Downstream, in Alapaha River Water Trail, by John S. Quarterman, for WWALS.net, 16 April 2015 ARWT Downstream PDF.

North Detail Maps

These two maps show different zoom levels for the north end of the ARWT. Both these maps have many layers turned on: Brochure, Other, Bridges, Gauge, Withlacoochee River North, and Willacoochee River. They were made for Update on Rowetown Church to GA 135: WWALS outing 2015-04-18. Remember: click on the map to see a bigger map.

ARWT North Overview

300x117 Rowetown with Alapaha, GA gauge, in Alapaha River Water Trail, by John S. Quarterman, for WWALS.net, 16 April 2015 This map is not zoomed in much so you can see the general overview.

ARWT North Detail

300x172 Rowetown Church Cemetery Context, in Alapaha River Water Trail, by John S. Quarterman, for WWALS.net, 16 April 2015 This map is zoomed in to show detail.

Florida Detail Maps

These two maps for areas in Florida have all the layers turned on and zoomed way in. Remember: click on the map to see a bigger map.

These are just example detail maps. It’s possible to do the same thing for any area. Some other likely candidates would be Lakeland, US 84, and Grand Bay.

ARWT Jennings

300x296 ARWT Jennings, in Alapaha River Water Trail, by John S. Quarterman, for WWALS.net, 16 April 2015 ARWT Jennings PDF.

Sasser Landing, the CR 150 road bridge, and the Jennings gauge are right on top of each other.

And the Alapaha River Sink is very close to the Dead River Sink.

Could deal with that by zooming in still closer on each spot. Except gauges tend to be actually on bridges, giving the same lat long. So no zoom will resolve that. Not unless we artificially separate them by, for example, giving a latlong for the road bridge as where it starts to rise off the road, rather than the middle.

This is why gauges have their own layer, so they can be turned on or off in the interactive map.

For the printed materials, I would suggest include a separate map of just the gauges.

ARWT Confluence

300x356 ARWT Confluence, in Alapaha River Water Trail, by John S. Quarterman, for WWALS.net, 16 April 2015 ARWT Confluence PDF.

This Confluence map has a problem because Google maps has Gibson Park marked on the wrong tract.

Everything

Finally, an example of the futility of trying to include everything on one big map. This one has all the layers turned on and was made in tabloid size, but it’s still impossible to see much. Notice two of the outfitters got stomped on by hiking trails and sponsors.

This is because things tend to cluster together geographically.

For example, access points tend to be near road bridges, which tend to have gauges and railroad bridges nearby, and places like Grand Bay can have multiple hiking trails, boat ramps, etc. very close together.

See above for the Jennings and Confluence maps as examples of how more things can be distinguished at zoomed-in scales.

300x633 ARWT Everything, in Alapaha River Water Trail, by John S. Quarterman, for WWALS.net, 16 April 2015

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